Irish Tea, Me, and History

I love St. Patrick’s Day! The bright colors of spring abound, and various birds of every description begin to flutter around in the trees, and celebrating the patron saint of The Emerald Isle marks the time of year when everything is about renewal and fresh beginnings.

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Photo by Melissa on Pexels.com

I usually partake in this special holiday by sporting the deep, green color of Ireland’s countryside through my wardrobe. I pull from my jewelry box a unique, gold-plated pin embellished with various charms and tokens representing the Emerald Isle and walk happily about with pride.

Twenty years ago, after I came across the family Bible from my mother’s paternal grandparents, I began researching my family tree. In those days, if you wanted to know more about where you came from and how you got here, you needed money, time, and a lot of patience. (All things I am very short of). Census records were kept on microfilm in a musty cavern beneath the structures of government buildings. You needed permission and someone who knew where to look for what it was you needed to look for. Those were the old days. At least I could ask my parents what they knew or had heard from relatives when they were growing up. But that was all I had, and as I am not a celebrity, no one from “Who Do You Think You Are?” was going to be knocking on my door with the answers in hand.

Today, we have the internet and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints to guide us in finding our family and those long, stretched out lineages of people who came before us. Through their website, http://www.familysearch.com, I was able to find relatives dating back to the 10th century from Wales. In fact, my mother’s grandfather’s line hasn’t a drop of Irish blood at all! But the Millikan family roots run deep in North Carolina, and it is from her father’s side of the family that we attribute to the sod of Ireland. It has been recorded that the Millikan clan came down from Pennsylvania after settling for a time with the Quaker’s of German descent. After a time, the English Quaker’s migrated south and settled permanently in the piedmont of North Carolina. When exactly, my family came from Ireland is still a mystery and it may take another twenty years of digging through records on the internet before I find the answers. But, I love a good mystery, and that is all part of geneology…looking for clues to unravel the different parts that make a whole.

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Photo by Lisa Fotios on Pexels.com

What I do know is that my family came here long before we called ourselves Americans. That in itself is an amazing discovery, and while I continue my journey, I will celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a good, strong cup of Irish Breakfast tea, and some, “hot from the oven,” delicious raisin scones. And with every sip and every bite, I will remember how fortunate I am to be made of so many wonderful ingredients. Afterall, that is the very heart of baking, bringing together the parts that are different to make something wonderful. Enjoy!

 

Recipe for Irish Raisin Scones

2 cups all- purpose flour

1/4 cup granulated sugar

2  1/2  tsp. baking powder

1/2 tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. shortening

3/4 cups of raisins

1 cup of buttermilk or scalded milk

 

Directions:

  1. Combine flour, sugar, and baking powder with salt in a mixing bowl. Cut in the shortening with a fork or pastry blender until the mixture is crumbly. Add raisins and the buttermilk and continue to mix with fork or pastry blender until ingredients are moist. The dough will be sticky.
  2. Place the dough onto a well floured surface and knead dough for approximately one minute. Shape into a ball and place dough onto ungreased baking sheet. Mark out with a knife wedges of eight pieces. Let dough rest for ten minutes. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until top is a golden brown. Make sure to insert a toothpick or skewer into middle to test for doneness. If not done, place bake in oven until dough is set in the center.

If you want a sweet, crunchy top for your scones, brush the top with a beaten egg and sprinkle with sugar before placing in oven to bake.

Serve warm with various jams, jellies, or preserves along with sweet cream or clotted cream. Enjoy with a cup of Irish Breakfast Tea or any other tea you prefer.

Author: ninaslilangel

Born in Georgia and raised in North Carolina, I inherited the baking bug like so many of us; through childhood memories and standing by my mother's side as she prepared our family meal. I began this blog as a way of sharing my love of Southern baking and its treasured heritage.

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